The Thirteenth Gate by Kat Ross – Review

The Thirteenth Gate
Kat Ross
Historical Fiction, Fantasy
The Thirteenth Gate (Dominion Mysteries) (Volume 2)
Buy on Amazon

It’s the Winter of 1988 and a doctor suspected of being Jack the Ripper, murders a man before disappearing from the asylum that held him. It’s up to Lady Vivienne Cumberland and her companion, Alec, to hunt down the most dangerous man they know. There’s more to the world than we’re allowed to see and in Victorian London, they’ve started to take precautions against the supernatural elements that threaten their world.

But Lady Vivienne is walking a dangerous line and one wrong step could upset the balance between worlds, throwing the Thirteenth Gate wide open to create hell on earth.

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The Daemoniac by Kat Ross – Review

The Daemoniac
Kat Ross
Historical Fiction, Mystery
The Daemoniac
Buy on Amazon

In three weeks, Jack the Ripper will terrorize London in the slum called Whitechapel, but across the pond in New York, there’s another serial killer who is taunting investigators. Fingerprints that are burned into skin, the smell of sulpher, and messages in Latin… all seem like a demon, but that’s silly. Demons don’t exist.

In The Daemoniac, Consulting detective Harrison Fearing Pell certainly doesn’t think so and even if her uncle, Arthur Conan Doyle is a believer, it will take more than a few cheap tricks to pull the wool over her eyes.

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The Vanishing Year By Kate Moretti – Review

The Vanishing Year
By Kate Moretti
Mystery, Thriller, Suspense
Buy on Amazon
The Vanishing Year

We start The Vanishing Year with Zoe Whittaker, the woman who has it all. She’s the wife of one of the richest men in the country, and she never wants for anything. The world is at Zoe’s beck and call, but she’s lucky in another way. Some people find themselves in cold, static marriages. But you couldn’t find someone more loving than Henry Whittaker and he is the solid foundation that Zoe has been searching for all her life.

Zoe has a secret she keeps from everyone, even Henry, and it’s bubbling back up to the surface. Her life is in danger and money alone won’t be enough to save her. When her past catches up to her, will Zoe be able to maintain the life she’s loved for the past year? Or will she vanish without a trace, just like they said she would?

The Vanishing Year is one heck of a ride.

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Lock & Mori by Heather W. Petty – Review

Lock & Mori
By Heather W. Petty
Young Adult, Mystery, Romance
Buy on Amazon
Lock & Mori (Lock & Mori, #1)

Knock, knock. It’s a modern day adaptation of Sherlock Holmes, kind of like the brilliant one done by the BBC except this time they’re teenagers and we’ve lost nearly all the emotional depth of the show.

The novel focuses in on Sherlock (Lock) and Moriarty (Mori) and their burgeoning relationship with each other. The father of one of their classmates is murdered and since the police are content to leave the murder unsolved, Sherlock challenges Moriarty to solve the case with him. Moriarty is unsure of her feelings. She has her brothers to think of and what would her cop father think if he knew she was mucking up crime scenes?

All of these questions and more are vaguely brought up in Lock & Mori without any real resolution.

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4 Strange Books from Canada that You Need to Read

It’s Canada’s birthday! Happy Birthday to you, Canada, even if you’re looking a little bit worse for wear.

Canada is 150 years old this year and the celebrations are bound to be fierce, but what matters the most is how odd we Canadians are. Yes, the stereotype is that we’re polite and all we write about is farming, but scratch under the surface and you’ll see that’s dead wrong. Not only are some of the quirkiest novels I’ve ever read written by Canadian authors, but the wide range of subjects is incredible.

I know you’ve got fireworks to see and two-fours to drink, so I’ll keep this brief. If you’re looking for an interesting read that will haunt the edges of your mind long after you’re done, you should check out the books below.

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The Only Child by Andrew Pyper – Review

Holy hell, what a ride.

I don’t remember where I first heard about The Only Child or how it ended up in my Overdrive account, but I went into the novel blind. I didn’t know anything about it. Would it be a family drama? A murder mystery?

After a couple pages, I was sure I knew what was going to come of this. It would be a murder mystery and our main character, Lily would find love or something along the way. I should have learned my lesson from underestimating The Girl On The Train last summer. Instead of the competent, but unmemorable novel I was expecting, I was blown away by how deep this rabbit hole went.

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Empty Mansions by Bill Dedman, Paul Clark Newell, Jr. – Review

I feel like we’re all hardwired to be suckers for good mysteries. It doesn’t have to be murder all the time (although my podcast lineup would beg to disagree), but when there’s something unknown, human nature drives to to try and figure it out. If there was the chance of foul play, especially with a huge fortune on the line, it can be hard to shrug your shoulders and walk away.

Empty Mansions feels a bit like a non-fiction carnival that has a little bit of everything, or perhaps it would be better described as an eclectic museum that has strange exhibits that you wouldn’t think were connected to each other at all. What does political corruption, Japanese paintings, dollhouses made to scale, running around the wild west, and ornate empty mansions have in common? If you were to walk into a museum and see these exhibits in place, they would probably seem bizarre.

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