Miranda and Caliban by Jacqueline Carey – Review

There are few things that would creep me out more than being on an island where there were only three people, but the island was big enough for people to hide on. Can you imagine it? You’re on an island, settling in for the night and all of a sudden you hear someone scream or even just the rustle of leaves. Was there a person in that bush? Am I about to be attacked by an animal? If I fall and break my leg, will I starve and die like that?

Just thinking about it gives me the heebie-jeebies, but I honestly wish that was the direction that Miranda and Caliban had taken. Instead, we were taken on a strange journey of abuse and isolation that meandered before sprinting toward its end.

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4 Strange Books from Canada that You Need to Read

It’s Canada’s birthday! Happy Birthday to you, Canada, even if you’re looking a little bit worse for wear.

Canada is 150 years old this year and the celebrations are bound to be fierce, but what matters the most is how odd we Canadians are. Yes, the stereotype is that we’re polite and all we write about is farming, but scratch under the surface and you’ll see that’s dead wrong. Not only are some of the quirkiest novels I’ve ever read written by Canadian authors, but the wide range of subjects is incredible.

I know you’ve got fireworks to see and two-fours to drink, so I’ll keep this brief. If you’re looking for an interesting read that will haunt the edges of your mind long after you’re done, you should check out the books below.

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The Only Child by Andrew Pyper – Review

Holy hell, what a ride.

I don’t remember where I first heard about The Only Child or how it ended up in my Overdrive account, but I went into the novel blind. I didn’t know anything about it. Would it be a family drama? A murder mystery?

After a couple pages, I was sure I knew what was going to come of this. It would be a murder mystery and our main character, Lily would find love or something along the way. I should have learned my lesson from underestimating The Girl On The Train last summer. Instead of the competent, but unmemorable novel I was expecting, I was blown away by how deep this rabbit hole went.

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Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch – Review

I’m going to level with you right now. My first instinct was to call shout from the heavens that I’ve found Eat, Pray, Love for young adults, but… I haven’t read Eat, Pray, Love and I only have the loosest idea of what it’s all about (I do know that Julia Roberts was in the movie though, so that’s something). So let’s not be disingenuous or misleading and instead look at Love & Gelato it’s own merits.

The title is apt and I guess what I wasn’t expecting out of this was the interesting dynamic between all the main characters. Normally parents in young adult novels play strictly supporting roles. They’re there to smile, help out, and then possibly die when the stakes need to be ramped up in a hurry.

Not so with Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch. Kind of… It’s complicated.

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The Potion Diaries by Amy Alward – Review

There are work weeks where you feel like it’s never going to end. Or maybe it’s when school is being killer. My go to has always been light-hearted books in those weeks. Ones that were cute, had some stakes to them, but that never made me anxious or worried. The Potion Diaries fits into this niche perfectly. Want a way to unwind? Want something fun and uncomplicated to read as you’re winding down for the weekend?

Start here.

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The Book of Whispers by Kimberley Starr – Review

[A copy of this book was provided to me by Netgalley in return for an unbiased review.]

I feel like if I were to have a catchphrase, it would be “X novel wasn’t what I was expecting”. Although I enjoyed nonfiction Medieval Christian Literature (particularly Hildegard of Bingen or Teresa of Avila), I’ve never enjoyed the fiction aspect of it. Perhaps it’s just too raw and comes too close to being preachy or maybe it’s because aspects of the Christianity that existed then still exist today. Especially when it comes to the Crusades.

The closest I’ve come to being fascinated the Crusades was when I was watching Kingdom of Heaven and that may just have been because it starred Orlando Bloom.

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The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict – Review

There are very few people I can think of who we idolize more than Einstein. He’s remembered fondly as the father of Relativistic Physics and his personal life is rarely looked at. Einstein changed the way that everyone looked at physics and the world around us, it was as big a leap forward as Newton discovering gravity (and also creating calculus so he could do the complex math needed for his equations). He changed the way we measure the movement of the planets and helped make our equations more precise.

It’s by taking relativistic changes into account that causes our GPS to be as accurate as it is, for example, and helps the positioning of our satellites even though both the satellites and the Earth are constantly moving at high speeds.

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6 Books with Flawed Fathers that You Need to Read

When you’re younger it’s easy to think that fathers are infallible. Maybe it’s just because they’re so tall, but fathers seem perfectly capable of chasing down monsters when you’re a kid. They’re there to be goofy with you, to help support your dreams, and to help you grow into the best adult that you can be. But there are times when fathers fall short of who they’re supposed to be.

Maybe it’s apparent when you’re a kid. Maybe you don’t realize until you’re older, but eventually that shoe has to drop.

Dads are people too and even if you love your father, he’s probably just as flawed as everyone else.

So in honour of Father’s Day and all those dads with all their flaws, here are my top 6 books with flawed father figures.
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We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson – Review

So what if I were to tell you that we weren’t the center of the universe and what if I were to tell you that I held the future of the entire world in the palm of my hand? That’s right. The aliens chose me and I don’t know why, but they told me I could decide whether or not the world keeps on existing.

Easy choice, right?

Not… exactly.

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